Jubilation bells

Amazayn tagline here

18,094 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

Today is the two-year anniversary of the publication of The Fault in Our Stars. I just wanted to share a couple memories with you of those days:
The first teenager to read TFIOS was my now-assistant Rosianna. We were at Vidcon and Rosianna’s dad had died unexpectedly that day, and she couldn’t get home to the UK to be with her family. That night, we were talking about Esther and about the book and I offered to let her read it. She read it overnight and the next morning when she returned the manuscript to me, she said, “It’s definitely the best book you’ve written,” and I really clung to that in the intervening months as I worried that I might disappoint all the people who’d preordered it.

Then, the night the book came out, Hank and I were in Boston to start the TFIOS tour. I was nervous about going on stage, and also upset because I’d promised all preorders would be signed but a bunch of unsigned books had been shipped to some people in Europe. Right before the show started, Esther’s family came backstage and talked to us. Lori and Wayne (Esther’s parents) were so kind about the book.
Since then, millions (!!!!) of people have been similarly generous to the book, forgiving its flaws and insufficiencies and finding in it something moving and helpful. I can never sufficiently express my gratitude to Rosianna, or to the Earls, or to all the people since who’ve loved and shared TFIOS. Nor can I ever thank Sarah, or Esther, or my publisher Julie Strauss-Gabel, who worked relentlessly on the book for so many years.
This is the nature of owing debts of gratitude, and I owe a lot of them. All I can say is thanks. Thanks for caring about Hazel and Gus. Thanks for loving them as I do. As long as people are still reading about them, they’re still here.

fishingboatproceeds:

Today is the two-year anniversary of the publication of The Fault in Our Stars. I just wanted to share a couple memories with you of those days:

The first teenager to read TFIOS was my now-assistant Rosianna. We were at Vidcon and Rosianna’s dad had died unexpectedly that day, and she couldn’t get home to the UK to be with her family. That night, we were talking about Esther and about the book and I offered to let her read it. She read it overnight and the next morning when she returned the manuscript to me, she said, “It’s definitely the best book you’ve written,” and I really clung to that in the intervening months as I worried that I might disappoint all the people who’d preordered it.

Then, the night the book came out, Hank and I were in Boston to start the TFIOS tour. I was nervous about going on stage, and also upset because I’d promised all preorders would be signed but a bunch of unsigned books had been shipped to some people in Europe. Right before the show started, Esther’s family came backstage and talked to us. Lori and Wayne (Esther’s parents) were so kind about the book.

Since then, millions (!!!!) of people have been similarly generous to the book, forgiving its flaws and insufficiencies and finding in it something moving and helpful. I can never sufficiently express my gratitude to Rosianna, or to the Earls, or to all the people since who’ve loved and shared TFIOS. Nor can I ever thank Sarah, or Esther, or my publisher Julie Strauss-Gabel, who worked relentlessly on the book for so many years.

This is the nature of owing debts of gratitude, and I owe a lot of them. All I can say is thanks. Thanks for caring about Hazel and Gus. Thanks for loving them as I do. As long as people are still reading about them, they’re still here.

24,126 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

January 10th is Alaska Young Day, celebrated by fans of Looking for Alaska. (Alaska and her mom went to the zoo on January 9th.)
Every year on January 10th, I see white flowers on my dashboard and I burst into tears.

fishingboatproceeds:

January 10th is Alaska Young Day, celebrated by fans of Looking for Alaska. (Alaska and her mom went to the zoo on January 9th.)

Every year on January 10th, I see white flowers on my dashboard and I burst into tears.

(Source: thewindsaid)

460,833 notes

johnlockandthedoctorsblog:

fuckyeahwomenprotesting2:

freedominwickedness:

In medieval culture, an event like a royal christening is not a private party; it’s the public social event of the year. To not invite any person of rank to such an event is a deadly insult.

Maleficent is certainly someone you wouldn’t want at a party, but she’s also someone powerful enough that only a fool would ever dare treat her with such blatant disrespect. The only way the King and Queen could possibly have gotten away with not inviting Maleficent was to not invite any of the fairies at all; inviting the other fairies and excluding her is explicitly taking sides in the conflict between the fairy factions.

Which means they made themselves her sworn enemies, and she responded by treating them as such from then on. If you actually get into analyzing the social dynamics of the scene, it’s very clear that Maleficent was willing to show mercy at first by giving the King and Queen a chance to apologize for their disrespect to her. She doesn’t curse Aurora until after she gives them that chance and they throw it back in her face with further disrespect.

And yeah, if the King and Queen had done the properly respectful thing and invited her, Maleficent would have given Aurora a scary awesome present. Moreover so would the other fairies, because at that point both sides would be using it as an opportunity to show off and one-up each other. What they gave her before Maleficent showed up was basically just trivial party favors by fairy standards.

How do you know so much about the social dynamics of medieval fairies

How don’t you

(Source: britta-perry, via scallizon)